Tuesday, August 18, 2015

our stories




According to the fascinating field of “narrative psychology,”(link is external) the stories we tell about ourselves are the key to our well-being. If you’ve interpreted the events of your life to mean that you’re unlucky or unwise, it’s hard to look optimistically at the future. Conversely, if you acknowledge that you’ve made mistakes and faced difficulties but seek (or have already glimpsed) redemption, you’ll feel a much greater sense of agency over your life.
-Susan Cain, author of Quiet

For the full article, go to: 
(link is external)the stories we tell about ourselves are the key to our well-being. If you’ve interpreted the events of your life to mean that you’re unlucky or unwise, it’s hard to look optimistically at the future. Conversely, if you acknowledge that you’ve made mistakes and faced difficulties but seek (or have already glimpsed) redemption, you’ll feel a much greater sense of agency over your life.

Monday, August 17, 2015

wedding pictures

We recently got all of our wedding weekend pictures back. 
The first event was the pithi, where the bride is covered with turmeric paste, which was traditionally thought to provide a glow for the wedding. All of the women in her community take turns applying the paste to her body.
The mendhi event was second. Indian brides get mendhi (henna) applied on their arms and legs, while guests get mendhi on their palms. 
Garba, the last event before the wedding, is a time for music and dance. 
The weekend ended with the wedding and reception. 


**All photos are by Reichman Photography

















































Monday, August 10, 2015

recent reflections

How do you balance your multiple projects? 

Every few months, I have to readjust my expectations about how much work I can accomplish within a given day, week, or month.

I started working at the hospital in July. Sometimes (like yesterday), the days are 15 hours and I come home with barely enough energy to eat. 

Samir and I still value the time after those days since seeing each other exhausted and for a couple of hours is a big improvement from seeing each other once every two months.

I walk to work, which means I spend a little over an hour each day on my feet. I realized this is a valuable time to reflect on other projects and flex my creativity muscles.  I also realized that I have to start on other projects right when I get home because if I wait, I'll surrender to exhaustion.  

There are still a lot of mistakes ahead and I know I'll always have a lot to learn. For now, I'm happy with this trial and error type of adjustment. 


Saturday, August 8, 2015

a writer's responsibility


"It is well to remember what is obvious but usually ignored: that every writer has to cope with the possibility in his given talent. 

Possibility and limitation mean about the same thing. It is the business of every writer to push his talent to its outermost limit, but this means the outermost limit of the kind of talent he has. "

Flannery O’Conner

Saturday, July 25, 2015

we have some impulse within us


Photo by: Reichman Photography


"We write for the same reason that we walk, talk, climb mountains or swim the oceans—because we can. We have some impulse within us that makes us want to explain ourselves to other human beings. That’s why we paint, that’s why we dare to love someone–because we have the impulse to explain who we are. Not just how tall we are, or thin...but who we are internally…perhaps even spiritually. There’s something which impels us to show our inner-souls. The more courageous we are, the more we succeed in explaining what we know."

Maya Angelou

Saturday, July 4, 2015

If I Knew Then: lessons I've learned

1. Throwing yourself into work you believe in will change you. It will empower you to navigate setbacks. It will make you a better person. Let the work change and let it change you. 

2. Don't wish for no failure. Wish for creative ways of dealing with it. Dwell in rock bottom for a bit---you're not the first person who has been there---and then move on. 

3. Anyone who is not in your life doesn't belong there. Never forget the things they taught you and be grateful for their absence.

4. Seek novelty with family. Learn your parents' and grandparents' backstories, the people they were before you existed.

5. Strike up conversations with bartenders. They've seen it all.

6. Compliment people on their strengths. There's a high chance they haven't heard about them enough.

7. The best friendships are the ones where honesty flows in both directions, where forgiveness is implied and doesn't have to be stated or pointed out.

8. When someone is wrong, they'll sometimes try even harder to defend themselves.

9. Embrace your parents as people with their own tapestries of triumph, pain, wisdom, and strength.

10. Look back only long enough to piece events together, to accept that everything had to occur to get you to where you are now.